UNSR Victoria Tauli-Corpuz

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End of mission statement by the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples, Victoria Tauli-Corpuz on her visit to Ecuador Print

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End of mission statement
by the United Nations Special Rapporteur
on the rights of indigenous peoples,
Victoria Tauli-Corpuz on her visit to Ecuador

Quito, November 29, 2018

 

Introduction and background

In my capacity as Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples, I have visited Ecuador from 19 to 29 November 2018. First of all, I would like to thank the Government of the Republic of Ecuador for inviting me, as well as for allowing me to conduct my visit in an independent manner. I regard this invitation as an indication of the Government's willingness to advance in a constructive dialogue towards the full implementation of the rights of indigenous peoples in the country.

During my 11-day visit, I have met with the President of the Republic, Mr. Lenin Moreno, several Ministers, high-level representatives from different ministries and governmental institutions, the President of the National Assembly, the Judiciary Council, the Supreme Court of Justice, the Attorney General, the Public Prosecutor and the Human Rights Ombudsperson, among others. I have also met with representatives from the civil society, academia, the private sector and the members of the UN system in the country.

I have also participated in one national assembly in Quito and two regional assemblies in Lago Agrio and Yakuwasi, Victoria del Portete, organised by the Confederación de las Nacionalidades Indígenas de Ecuador, CONAIE, its confederations ECUARUNARI, CONFENIAE and CONAICE, and its federations and organisations. I would like to express my gratitude to CONAIE for the hard work in organising and coordinating these very important meetings. Through them, I have had the opportunity to meet with hundreds of representatives of indigenous communities, peoples and nationalities from the Sierra, the Coast and the Amazon. Furthermore, I visited the Shuar Centre of Kupiamai and the community of Tundayme in the Morona Santiago and Zamora Chinchipe Provinces, and the Sápara community of Jandayaku in Pastaza. In the city of Latacunga, I met with representatives of indigenous peoples of the Sierra to hear about indigenous justice, while in Cangahua, members of the Kayambi people introduced their actions and proposals on intercultural bilingual education to me. I was sorry not to be able to visit the territories of the indigenous nationalities of the Coast, but I had the chance to meet with members of the Épera, Chahi and Awá nationalities in Ibarra. I also held meetings with authorities of Waorani nationality, including from the Bameno community, and had separate meetings with indigenous women. I would like to express my deepest regrets to the communities that had invited me, but where I could not visit due the short time available for my mission, in particular to the community of Molleturo, affected by the Rio Blanco project. Please rest assured that I will carefully consider all the information you have submitted to me in my final report.

In all these meetings, I have received an enormous amount of oral testimonies and written information. While I will be reviewing this information in detail over the coming months for the preparation of my final report to the Human Rights Council to be submitted in September 2019, I would hereby like to share some preliminary observations and recommendations. My visit to Ecuador takes place in the year of the tenth anniversary of the adoption of the 2008 Montecristi Constitution. Therefore, I thought it would be timely to assess the progress in the implementation of the Constitutional commitments regarding the building of a plurinational State, including the effective application of the collective rights of indigenous communes, communities, peoples and nationalities in light of Ecuador's international human rights obligations in this regard. I also wanted to follow up on the outstanding observations and recommendations made by my predecessors, Rodolfo Stavenhagen in 2006 and James Anaya in 2009.

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International human rights perspectives on access to justice for indigenous peoples in Mexico Print

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International human rights perspectives on access to justice
for indigenous peoples in Mexico.

Presentation by Victoria Tauli-Corpuz,
United Nations Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples

for the
Forum on Access to Justice for Indigenous Persons and Peoples
Federal Judiciary Council (15 October 2018)


Introduction

Dear ladies and gentlemen present here today. I would like to thank the Federal Judiciary Council for inviting me to speak before this important seminar on the issue of access to justice for indigenous peoples.

I want to give my respect to the indigenous peoples of this country whose right to access to justice is the subject of discussion in this seminar.

As Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, I am tasked to look into the obstacles, challenges, barriers and good practices of States in protecting, respecting and fulfilling the rights of indigenous peoples. It was in the context of this mandate that I was invited by the Government of Mexico to undertake an official country mission from 8 to 17 November 2017. My mission had the two-fold purpose of assessing the implementation of the recommendations that my predecessor Special Rapporteur Rodolfo Stavenhagen made in 2003 and to evaluate how Mexico has implemented its international commitments on indigenous peoples' human rights.

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Presentation by the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples of her Report on her mission to Mexico Print

vtcmexico2018

Presentation by
the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples,
Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, of her Report on her mission to Mexico
Mexico City, Mexico (15 October 2018)


Introduction

Dear ladies and gentlemen present,

I would like to express my gratitude for this opportunity to speak today and present my report on my official visit to Mexico which I undertook on 8 to 17 November 2017.

I would like to give my respect to the indigenous peoples of this country whose rights were the subject of my visit and of this report, and whose societies, cultures and traditions have contributed greatly to the rich history, culture and diverse fabric of this nation.

My visit to Mexico had a two-fold purpose: to assess the implementation of the recommendations that my predecessor Special Rapporteur Rodolfo Stavenhagen made in 2003, and to evaluate how Mexico has implemented its international human rights commitments related to indigenous peoples.

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Presentation to the UN General Assembly 2018. Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples Print

2018 statement GA

Statement of

Ms. Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, 
Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples

Presentation to the Third Committee of the General Assembly
at its 73rd Session Item 71 (a & b): Rights of indigenous peoples

New York, 12th of October 2018

Honourable Chair of the Third Committee, Mr. Mahmoud Saikal
Distinguished Representatives of Member States,

Indigenous representatives and authorities in the room and across the world,
Excellencies, ladies and gentlemen,

It is a pleasure for me to address the General Assembly today for the fifth time since I took up the mandate as Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples in 2014. Over the last half decade, I have been reporting here and at the Human Rights Council on a range of troubling issues for indigenous peoples. I have tried to shed light on the structural reasons behind the human rights violations and marginalisation that indigenous peoples continue to face almost in every country. I have explored topics such as the impact of international investment and free trade agreements on indigenous peoples' rights; the impact of conservation and climate change adaption and mitigation projects; and the increasing attacks, criminalisation and even murder of indigenous peoples, amongst other issues.

Today, I want to discuss what I see as one of the possible solutions to address the challenges that indigenous peoples face across the world: namely the importance of protecting and promoting the role of indigenous peoples' own institutions and ways of governing themselves. At the core of this are the rights to self-determination, self- governance and autonomy.

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Statement of Ms. Victoria Tauli-Corpuz Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples to the Human Rights Council 39th Session Print

 vickyhrc2018

 

Statement of Ms. Victoria Tauli-Corpuz
Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples
to the Human Rights Council 39th Session

Geneva, 19 September 2018

Mr. President,
Distinguished delegates,
Indigenous peoples' representatives,
Ladies and gentlemen,

It is an honour for me to address the Human Rights Council today and present my reports. I would like to start by expressing my gratitude to the numerous States, indigenous peoples, and others, and in particular to the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, for the support they have provided as I have carried out my mandate over the past year.

I have, in the exercise of my mandate, observed a worrying escalation in the attacks, criminalisation and threats against indigenous peoples who are defending their rights to protect their lands, territories and resources. For this reason, I have decided to dedicate my thematic report to the Council to this topic.

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